Gezi Park Massacre

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Part of Istanbul has been turned into a war zone after riot police unleashed tear gas and water cannon on protesters that ignored an order from the country’s prime minister not to gather on the anniversary of the national anti-government protests that swept across the country in 2013.

According to AP, hundreds of protesters were forced to mass on Istiklal Avenue in the city centre, having failed to reach Taksim square after their path was blocked by riot police and armoured vehicles. This led to clashes and the police opening fire. A number of demonstrators have reportedly been arrested. Similar clashes have been in the capital city of Ankara.

Earlier, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has warned protesters not to gather for the anniversary. He said: “I am calling on my people: don’t fall for this trap. This is not an innocent environmental action. If you go there, our security forces are under strict orders, they will do whatever is necessary from A to Z. You won’t be able to go to Gezi like the last time. You have to obey the laws. If you don’t, the state will do whatever is necessary.” According to the BBC, Turkish authorities promised that more than 25,000 police officers would be on duty to stop the anniversary protests reaching Taksim square.

The demonstrations began last year after a campaign to save Gezi Park from demolition gathered momentum, eventually gathering in more than 3 million demonstrators in an outpouring of anger against Erdogan’s authoritarian Islamic regime. Eight people died and thousands were injured as police tried to stop the mass protests, which spread from Istanbul to many other parts of the country.

  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Protesters run away as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    A protester walks away with closed eyes as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Turkish riot police use tear gas to disperse protesters gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters lie on the ground as Turkish riot police officers fire tear gas to disperse demonstrators gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Injured protesters escape as Turkish riot police use tear gas to disperse protesters who gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • Getty Images
    Turkish riot police officers hold up a protester seriously affected by tear gas as police officers use tear gas to disperse protesters who gathered on the central Istoklal avenue near Taksim square in Istanbul, on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • PA
    Protesters clash with Turkish Riot on the first anniversary of last year’s protests near Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey , on May 31, 2014.
  • Getty Images
    Turkish riot police officers block access to Taksim square on May 31, 2014, during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • PA
    Protesters clash with Turkish riot police Gazi District of Suburb Istanbul, on the first anniversary of last year’s Taksim Gezi protests in Istanbul, Turkey, on May 31, 2014.
  • Getty Images
    Turkish riot police officers detain CNN International correspondent Ivan Watson (Center L) near Taksim square on May 31, 2014, as the police blocked access to the square during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.
  • PA
    Protesters clash with Turkish riot police Gazi District of Suburb Istanbul, on the first anniversary of last year’s Taksim Gezi protests in Istanbul, Turkey, on May 31, 2014.
  • Getty Images
    A photographer takes a photo of Turkish riot police officers standing in line as they block access to Taksim square on May 31, 2014, during the one year anniversary of the Gezi park and Taksim square demonstrations.

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A year after the protests, Gezi Park nurtures the seeds of a new Turkey

The unrest that shook Istanbul began in anger over the loss of green space but became the catalyst for a wider awareness
Protesters at Istanbul's Gezi Park in June 2013
Protesters at Istanbul’s Gezi Park in June last year, at the height of the unrest. Photograph: Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

As the former head gardener of Gezi Park for 20 years, Cemal Özay, 68, knows every inch by heart and remembers every tree he planted. “What is it with this government’s love for concrete?” he says. “When I started, this park was a huge garden, green and full of flowers I had grown myself.”

Last year this small area of Istanbul witnessed very different scenes. In what was arguably the largest wave of protests in recent Turkish history, hundreds of thousands took to the streets to contest the proposed demolition of the park to make way for an Ottoman-style shopping centre, a project pushed personally by prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

"They don’t like trees, because trees don’t generate a profit," Özay concludes. "Even the smallest city gardens and parks are now seen as a possibility for investment."

The government’s uncompromising stance and a heavy-handed police crackdown on protesters led to the protests quickly spreading all overTurkey, turning an initial environmental movement into a revolt against the increased authoritarianism of the country’s leader.

Two weeks after the start of the revolt police forces violently evicted all protesters from Gezi Park. According to the Turkish doctors’ organisation, the protests took a heavy human toll: eight people died, at least four as a result of police violence. About 8,000 were injured, 104 sustained serious head injuries and 11 people lost an eye, most as a result of plastic bullets fired by the police.

turkey1Protestors clash with Turkish riot policemen on the way to Taksim Square in Istanbul on June 5, 2013. Photograph: Bulent Kilic/AFP

Feminist activist Mehtap Dogan, who was in the park when construction workers wanted to cut down the first trees, says that even the increasingly violent crackdowns did not deter protesters.

"Gezi broke down the wall of fear. For the first time, people were disappointed when they were not in the park for a police crackdown. Everybody wanted to be there, and support everybody else."

The Turkish government consented not to build the planned shopping mall, but swiftly proceeded to crush most dissent. Many of those who had supported, reported on, or even tweeted the protests lost their jobs. Some face criminal charges; hundreds are still on trial.

For Mücella Yapici, 63, architect and founding member of the activist group Taksim Solidarity, who stands accused of starting a “criminal organisation” and faces 29 years in jail, the Gezi protests last year were only the beginning: “A new solidarity was born in June, and it’s not over. The most important thing is that the people re-learned how to raise their voices against the crimes and injustices that are being committed against them. Gezi was a lesson in democracy.”

One year later, the spectre of the summer revolts still looms large over the embattled prime minister, who increasingly looks like he might have failed to learn the lesson. In response to allegations of cronyism and mass corruption inside the government, Erdogan has increasingly opted for a strategy of dividing the country into loyalists and traitors. He purged the police and judiciary of critics and passed laws that weakened constitutional checks and balances on the executive. In an attempt to stifle all criticism, the pressure on the media has increased, Twitter was temporarily closed down and YouTube is still inaccessible from inside Turkey.

turkey2An anti goverment protester flashes a victory sign during the clashes between protestors and riot police on Taksim square in Istanbul on June 22, 2013. Photograph: Ozan Kose/AFP

Yapici thinks that the increased police and state violence, the mounting pressure and repressive laws, are all a sign of fear: “They are afraid because they saw what we can achieve when we all stick together. They lash out against us, and will continue to do so. Very hard times are ahead of us.”

While the government might have agreed to preserve the park, it remains Istanbul’s most contested plot of land, immediately closed down by the authorities at the slightest whiff of public dissent.

Erdogan still accuses “Gezi provocateurs” – schemers both foreign and domestic, according to the prime minister – of plotting against Turkey: “[After the protest started], the stock exchange started to drop, and interest rates went up,” Erdogan said, speaking at an AK party meeting this week. “They vandalised the streets. They pretended that terror reigned everywhere in Turkey. The opposition poured gasoline onto the fire. MPs took on an active role and distributed provisions and money. They insulted the police. Partisan media wrote lies to push people to protest. Employers, employers’ organisations and unions made irresponsible declarations. For what? For 12 trees!”

But for many of those who participated in the Gezi protests, the lessons learned are invaluable.

"We now have a taste of what it is like to go out in the street. We are now a society that got a taste of what it is like to challenge our government. That never existed in Turkey," says anthropologist and journalist Ayse Çavdar. "Gezi fundamentally changed the foundations and the language of politics. This is new because Gezi doesn’t suggest any power practices. Quite the contrary – Gezi is a certain outlook on life, it’s the practice of judging power. It suggests ethical guidelines for all of us."

Yapici agrees. “Gezi created an awareness of urban renewal processes, of solidarity with victims of gentrification and displacement, and awareness for our city. We don’t accept any more that decisions concerning our living spaces are simply forced down our throats.”

turkey3A protestor is hit by water sprayed from a water cannon during clashes in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Turkey, 11 June 2013. Photograph: Kerim Okten/EPA

Çavdar stresses that one of the main achievements of the protest movement was to shatter the narrow identities imposed by state discourse: “Gezi brought down the walls between conservative Muslims and secularists, nationalist Turks and Kurds, Alevis and Sunnis, men and women. Everybody started talking. Why should the state tell me what to think about Kurds, about Alevis, or about my neighbours? I’ll decide that myself. They should worry about healthcare, education, maybe sidewalks.”

Feminist activist Dogan says that this dialogue also did much to challenge sexist, homophobic and transphobic stereotypes: “People even stopped using expressions like ‘faggot’ and ‘whore’ in their protest slogans when they realised that LGBTs and sex workers, too, were with them in the park.

"We also realised that conservative women and women wearing headscarves share many of our problems: domestic violence, equal pay, access to abortion. This created much wider solidarity networks between women."

Dr Incilay Erdogan, a member of the Istanbul Chamber of Medical Doctors’ human rights commission who volunteered in makeshift clinics throughout last June, at the height of the unrest, thinks that the Gezi protests taught people in Turkey more solidarity across ethnic, religious and class lines.

"When we used to do press declarations on the lack of work safety and workers’ rights, there were usually a few dozen people, if at all," she says. "But after [the mine disaster in] Soma, there were several thousands, and all of them had come despite knowing that they would get teargassed for it.” She beams. “I think we owe this to Gezi.”

turkey4A Turkish riot policeman uses tear gas against a woman as people protest against the destruction of trees in a park brought about by a pedestrian project, in Taksim Square in central Istanbul May 28, 2013. Photograph: Osman Orsal/Reuters

According to Dr Erdogan, a much wider group in Turkish society is now aware of how arbitrary police violence can be, and that criminal justice in Turkey is not necessarily just: “Everybody saw how ordinary people demanding more rights were called ‘terrorists’ by the government. Everybody saw how the mainstream media are used to peddle the government line. We have learned to approach authority with much more caution.”

Social movements and ideas of how to challenge power certainly emerged from the June protests in Gezi Park – neighbourhood forums, politically motivated squatting, and volunteer election observers are just a few of the social experiments now under way in Turkey.

Çavdar thinks that those who complain that Gezi did not create any tangible change do the movement a disservice.

"It drives me nuts to hear people complain that Gezi did not produce any alternative: Gezi produced the mother of all alternatives. Many parties and groups will yet emerge and compete with each other. We won’t have to decide between the AKP and the [main opposition] CHP. This political status quo is finished."

Walking through the sunny park on a late afternoon in May, gardener Özay is optimistic that the Gezi spirit will prevail: “I am hopeful. Things will get better again.” He smiles. “In the end the good people always win. People who only think of profit will lose in the long run. Who will support somebody who does not love trees?”

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A man kisses his son, rescued of the mine, on May 13, 2014 after an explosion in a coal mine in Manisa. At least 157 miners were killed in collapsed coal mine in the western Turkish city of Manisa.

A man kisses his son, rescued of the mine, on May 13, 2014 after an explosion in a coal mine in Manisa. At least 157 miners were killed in collapsed coal mine in the western Turkish city of Manisa.

Getty Images

Rescuers are in a race against time to reach the hundreds of miners who are still trapped underground in a coal mine in western Turkey.

The government confirmed the disaster has killed at least 230 miners in an explosion and fire on Tuesday.

READ MORE: More than 230 dead after explosion at coal mine in Turkey

There were 787 people inside the mine at the time, and fewer than half of them were rescued.

Below is a look at some heartbreaking and powerful images from the deadly Turkey mine explosion.

People cry after their relatives died in the explosion.

People cry after their relatives died in the explosion.

Getty Images
Miners are helped by rescue workers and friends from the coal mine.

Miners are helped by rescue workers and friends from the coal mine.

Ozgu Ozdemir/Getty Images
Protesters lie down, acting as dead miners in front of a Turkish flag at half mast at Taksim square in Istanbul.

Protesters lie down, acting as dead miners in front of a Turkish flag at half mast at Taksim square in Istanbul.

Getty Images
A miner being helped by rescue workers.

A miner being helped by rescue workers.

Getty Images
People stand in front of a hospital in Soma.

People stand in front of a hospital in Soma.

Getty Images
Miners are helped by rescue workers and friends from the coal mine.

Miners are helped by rescue workers and friends from the coal mine.

Ozgu Ozdemir/Getty Images
An injured miner came out carried by rescuers.

An injured miner came out carried by rescuers.

Getty Images
Protestors leave miner helmets front of riot police shields in Istanbul. The helmets said ‘not an industrial accident, murder.’

Protestors leave miner helmets front of riot police shields in Istanbul. The helmets said ‘not an industrial accident, murder.’

Getty Images
An injured miner.

An injured miner.

  By Irene Ogrodnik   Global News

‪#‎Turkey‬ ‪#‎Soma‬ 
‪#‎KaderDeğilİşCinayeti‬
‪#‎SomadaKazaDegilCinayetVar‬

Death toll rises in coal mine explosion. 201 workers are killed according to official reports. Witnesses insist reports are not reflecting the magnitude of the tragedy taking place in Soma.

"Several hundred miners have been killed following an explosion near the town of Soma.

An estimated 700-1000 miners were inside at the time of the explosion. Some of them working near the upper gallery have been saved, while the rest of them are largely presumed dead by now.

The mainstream media reported the total death toll as 17 for several hours, even as the bodies kept coming on gurneys during the live broadcast. The figure was subsequently corrected to 151 after announced as so by a government minister, while the real number is estimated to be much higher.

The coal mine at Soma was inspected at least 10 times in the recent years and closed after 66 faults were found, only to be reopened due to political pressure. Some 5000 accidents occured at Soma in 2013 alone, causing 95 deaths. Main opposition party CHP had submitted a motion to demand a parliamentary investigation regarding the deaths at the mine only two weeks ago.

The miners interviewed on TV say they get paid 40 Liras ($19/€14) for a day’s work and practically have no social security. The miners also say that the conditions have got far worse since the mines have been privatised, any complaint or incapacity costs them their jobs, and the unions are acting in complicity with the bosses..”

Report by LiveUpdatesFrom Turkey 
Photo credit: Kamera Sokak (11 photos)

america-wakiewakie:

NYPD Twitter Photo Contest Backfires, Police Brutality Photos Flood Twitter | The Anti-Media
If you need something to uplift your mood today, maybe this will do It.
Awareness of reality was shown to be alive and well today, as a NYPD twitter photo contest –intended to paint a good picture of the violent police state– ended up backfiring.
Instead of photos intended to blindly support the violent police state being posted, the contest ended up being flooded with photos of the NYPD violently abusing people.
There were simply too many photos to count. Here are the results from a Twitter search from the #myNYPD hashtag event:
Tweets about “#myNYPD”
This to a victory for awareness, and a loss for propaganda.
I hope your day was made better by this event making it clear that masses of people continue to grow in awareness, exponentially, and that we are shaping a future for ourselves, free of violence and coercion.
Please share this info with as many people as possible, especially both people who already know what the police state does and need something to better their day, and people who justify the existence of a violent monopoly on force by any means necessary.
(Photo Credit: kinja.com)

america-wakiewakie:

NYPD Twitter Photo Contest Backfires, Police Brutality Photos Flood Twitter | The Anti-Media

If you need something to uplift your mood today, maybe this will do It.

Awareness of reality was shown to be alive and well today, as a NYPD twitter photo contest –intended to paint a good picture of the violent police state– ended up backfiring.

Instead of photos intended to blindly support the violent police state being posted, the contest ended up being flooded with photos of the NYPD violently abusing people.

There were simply too many photos to count. Here are the results from a Twitter search from the #myNYPD hashtag event:

This to a victory for awareness, and a loss for propaganda.

I hope your day was made better by this event making it clear that masses of people continue to grow in awareness, exponentially, and that we are shaping a future for ourselves, free of violence and coercion.

Please share this info with as many people as possible, especially both people who already know what the police state does and need something to better their day, and people who justify the existence of a violent monopoly on force by any means necessary.

(Photo Credit: kinja.com)

(cultureofresistance gönderdi)

Kaynak: america-wakiewakie

Gülse Birsel'e açık mektup!

caponlar:

Eyy kendini kaydadeğer sananlar kulübünün möhim şahsiyeti!

Demişsiniz ya, ”hadi birbirimizle bir iletişim kuralım yahuu, herkes birbirini dinlesin” diye.

Okudum yazdıklarınızı.

”Gülse Birsel’den paylaşım rekorları kıran satırlar”ınızı.

Ellerinize sağlık!

”Paylaşım rekorları” kırdı…

Kaynak: caponlar

Twitter has been blocked in turkey!

#TwitterisblockedinTurkey

Is Turkey heading toward Alevi-Sunni clashes? - Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle East

policymic:

Protests return to Turkey after 15-year-old dies

It’s the age of political protests. In Ukraine, Venezuela, Thailand and more, demonstrators are swarming the streets to voice their anger and dissatisfaction with their respective governments. Now a fresh round of protests are beginning in Turkey as well, inspired by the death of an Istanbul teenager who was injured during last year’s anti-government rallies.

Berkin Elvan, 15, passed away on Tuesday after being in a coma for nine months. On June 16 he had left home to buy a loaf of bread and got caught up in the protests. He was struck on the head by a police tear gas canister and suffered blunt force trauma. In July, angry crowds who’d gathered to hear his mother speak were dispered by Turkish riot police with pepper sprays and beatings.

It’s been relatively quiet in Istanbul since then, but Elvan’s recent death has reignited the flame. Enraged by the death of an innocent boy at the hands of the Turkish police, tens of thousands of people protested in over 30 cities across the country. Thousands of mourners turned up to Elvan’s funeral and began a march, while students in Ankara boycotted class and staged sit-ins.

Read moreFollow policymic

(erdemou gönderdi)

Kaynak: micdotcom

"Erdogan, schick Bilal zum Brotholen!"

Cevahir’e biber gazı

Thousands of people are marching to the Ferikoy Cemetary with Berkin Elvan in Istanbul.

Artık öldürmeyin yeter!
İzmir’de yaşlı bir kadın elindeki ekmekle çevik kuvvet ekiplerinin yanına giderek onlardan birine sarıldı ve “Yeter artık öldürmeyin çocukları” diye seslendi.


İzmir’de polis, Berkin Elvan’ı anmak isteyen ve hiç bir taşkınlık yapmayan yurttaşlara, dün olduğu gibi bugün de tazyikli su ve biber gazıyla müdahale etti. Berkin Elvan’ın İstanbul’da toprağa verildiği saatlerde İzmir’de de, DİSK, KESK, TMMOB’un çağrısıyla anma eylemi gerçekleştirildi. Konak Alanı girişinde bir araya gelen binlerce İzmirli, saygı duruşunda bulundu. İzmir Büyükşehir Belediye Başkanı Aziz Kocaoğlu, CHP İzmir milletvekilleri Alaattin Yüksel, Mustafa Moroğlu ve çok sayıda yurttaşın katıldığı anmada“Berkin Elvan ölümsüzdür” pankartları taşındı.
FOTO GALERİ-İZMİR’DE POLİS SALDIRISI
Grup, saygı duruşunun ardından İzmir Saat Kulesi önüne giderek Berkin Elvan anısına mum dikmek istedi. Konak Alanı girişinde bekleyen Toma ve çevik kuvvet ekipleri ise yürüyen ekibe izin vermeyerek tazyikli su ve biber gazıyla müdahale etti. Polisin saldırısının ardından bir grup İzmir Büyükşehir Belediye binasına sığındı. Çevik kuvvet ekipleri de bu yurttaşları gözaltına almak için belediye kapısını zorladı. Ancak güvenlik görevlileri polisin içeri girmesine izin vermedi. Atılan gazlar rüzgarın etkisiyle Tarihi Kemeraltı Çarşısı’na kadar ulaştı. Çok sayıda yurttaşın gazdan etkilenerek tepki göstermesi üzerine polis geri çekilmek zorunda kaldı. Bu sırada yaşlı bir kadın yurttaş, elindeki ekmekle çevik kuvvet ekiplerinin yanına giderek onlardan birine sarıldı ve “Yeter artık öldürmeyin çocukları” diye seslendi.
VİDEO-YAŞLI KADIN BÖYLE FERYAT ETTİ

 

Artık öldürmeyin yeter!

İzmir’de yaşlı bir kadın elindeki ekmekle çevik kuvvet ekiplerinin yanına giderek onlardan birine sarıldı ve “Yeter artık öldürmeyin çocukları” diye seslendi.

İzmir’de polis, Berkin Elvan’ı anmak isteyen ve hiç bir taşkınlık yapmayan yurttaşlara, dün olduğu gibi bugün de tazyikli su ve biber gazıyla müdahale etti. Berkin Elvan’ın İstanbul’da toprağa verildiği saatlerde İzmir’de de, DİSK, KESK, TMMOB’un çağrısıyla anma eylemi gerçekleştirildi. Konak Alanı girişinde bir araya gelen binlerce İzmirli, saygı duruşunda bulundu. İzmir Büyükşehir Belediye Başkanı Aziz Kocaoğlu, CHP İzmir milletvekilleri Alaattin Yüksel, Mustafa Moroğlu ve çok sayıda yurttaşın katıldığı anmada“Berkin Elvan ölümsüzdür” pankartları taşındı.

FOTO GALERİ-İZMİR’DE POLİS SALDIRISI

Grup, saygı duruşunun ardından İzmir Saat Kulesi önüne giderek Berkin Elvan anısına mum dikmek istedi. Konak Alanı girişinde bekleyen Toma ve çevik kuvvet ekipleri ise yürüyen ekibe izin vermeyerek tazyikli su ve biber gazıyla müdahale etti. Polisin saldırısının ardından bir grup İzmir Büyükşehir Belediye binasına sığındı. Çevik kuvvet ekipleri de bu yurttaşları gözaltına almak için belediye kapısını zorladı. Ancak güvenlik görevlileri polisin içeri girmesine izin vermedi. Atılan gazlar rüzgarın etkisiyle Tarihi Kemeraltı Çarşısı’na kadar ulaştı. Çok sayıda yurttaşın gazdan etkilenerek tepki göstermesi üzerine polis geri çekilmek zorunda kaldı. Bu sırada yaşlı bir kadın yurttaş, elindeki ekmekle çevik kuvvet ekiplerinin yanına giderek onlardan birine sarıldı ve “Yeter artık öldürmeyin çocukları” diye seslendi.

VİDEO-YAŞLI KADIN BÖYLE FERYAT ETTİ